An interesting but unusual story recently hit Catholic cyberspace.  It appeared in ZENIT, the news agency run by the Legionaries of Christ.  Entitled “Believe-it-or-Not Cancer Drug: CellAdam is Natural, Successful and Ethical,” its author interviewed the chariman, president and public relations officer of Biostemworld, the company manufacturing and marketing this supposed wonderdrug.  The journalist does a straightforward, one might say uncritical, interview.  The “non-profit company” claims its homeopathic drug called “CellAdam” has an astonishing 75% success rate.  ZENIT later posted a short note saying they do not endorse the drug: “The views expressed were those of the writer, who was impressed by the faith and sincerity of the company’s Catholic directors and their belief in the treatment’s effectiveness. We recommend that readers interested in the drug do their own research, or wait for the results of the clinical trials that will be completed in the next few years.”  That’s if any real and independent clinical trials are actually intended.  I would like to believe such a safe and simple cure is possible and is already available. I would also be tickled pink if some devout Catholics were marketing it relatively cheap due to altruistic and religious motives.  But what I would like to believe is neither here nor there. “Counterknowledge,” a website dedicated to “exposing conspiracy theories, cults, quack medicine, bogus science and fake history” dissects the ZENIT interview.  Note, it is done in a mocking fashion.  Some of the comments and links at the end of the article are helpful. Damian Thompson, editor-in-chief of Counterknowledge, writes an online article for the Telegraph reiterating his skepticism of the claims.  Matthew Hartfield, a PhD student in genetics and contributor to Counterknowledge, critiques Celladam.com‘s scientific language.  Finally, the same website finds potentially suspicious things with Biostemworld’s business practices.  The Competition Bureau of Canada has created a webpage to help one discern online health scams and cancer frauds.

One Response to “Catholic Cure for Cancer?”
  1. Det. Cluso says:

    Please help us with our investigation, by providing anything you know about this.
    http://www.twitter.com/ponzibuster or ponzibuster@gmail.com
    TX!

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